FALL 2002

230-203: GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT

 

Instructor: Hatice Deniz Yükseker         e-mail: deniz@jhu.edu

Meetings: Thursdays: 10:30-12:00 at 311 Hodson

Friday Sections: 10:30-12:00 at 311 Hodson and 526 Mergenthaler

e-mail: deniz@jhu.edu

Office: 532 Mergenthaler Hall and 203 The Greenhouse

Office Hours: Wednesdays: 2:00-3:00 and by appointment (at 532 Mergenthaler)

TA: Çetin Eren

Office: … Mergenthaler

Office Hours:

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will first introduce students to the field of development. Then, we will discuss gender issues within the process of economic development. Our geographical focus will be on Africa, South and Southeast Asia and the Americas. Some of the topics that we will cover are: how do development projects affect men and women differently; feminization of the industrial labor force; women in agriculture; women and the environment; gender and migration; and changing gender relations within households.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: The course is based on lectures on Thursdays and more detailed discussion of the readings in two sections on Fridays. Students must attend regularly and do weekly readings before class each week. You should come to the sections on Friday with specific discussion questions based on the readings. (1) Each student will write 6 reading reviews (2 double-spaced pages) over the semester and turn these in on the day that reading piece is discussed. (The reading reviews should contain a brief summary of the main points of one of the assigned readings and your comments on it. You can choose readings from any week, provided that 3 reviews be written before the midterm exam.) (2) You will also write 1-2-page (double-spaced) reviews of the films shown in class. (3) There will also be a research assignment. You will write a 3-page (double-spaced) paper, critically assessing a journalistic piece (that you will research in the library or on the internet) in terms of issues and concepts discussed in the course. This is due on October 11. (4) There will be an in-class midterm exam on October 18.

(5) Take-home finals (10 double-spaced pages) are due on December 16.

 

The breakup of grading is as follows:

30 percent: all reviews

20 percent: in-class midterm exam

10 percent: assignment

30 percent: take-home final exam

10 percent: class participation (regular attendance, active participation in discussions)

 

Note on plagiarism: Any use of another person's ideas or words, taken directly or paraphrased, without citing the source is plagiarism. This includes taking material from the Internet without citing the website. Plagiarism and other forms of cheating will not be tolerated.

 

 

BOOKS AND ARTICLES:

All reading materials are on reserve. The following books are also on sale at the University Book Center.

* The Women, Gender and Development Reader (Viswanathan et al.) (1997)

*Development and Social Change. A Global Perspective. (McMichael) (2000-2nd edition)

*Spirits of Resistance and Capitalist Discipline. Factory Women in Malaysia (Ong) (1987)

*Factory Daughters. Gender, Household Dynamics and Rural Industrialization in Java (Wolf) (1992)

*Making a Living. Changing Livelihoods in Rural Africa (Francis) (2000)

*The Kitchen Spoon’s Handle: Transnationalism and Migration in Sri Lanka. (Gamburd) (2000)

 

COURSE OUTLINE:

 

WEEK ONE. Sept. 5-6: INTRODUCTION

 

WEEK TWO. Sept. 12-13: THE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT AND ITS DEMISE

Thursday: Development and Social Change: Part I: pp. 1-76  (skim through case studies)

Friday: Development and Social Change: Part II: pp. 79-100 and 113-133. Part III: pp. 149-164 (skim through case studies)

 

WEEK THREE. Sept. 19-20: WOMEN AND DEVELOPMENT
Women, Gender and Development Reader: pp. 17-32 and 33-54 (Tinker, Beneria and Sen, Young); and pp. 79-86 (Mohanty)

Friday: Discussion

 

WEEK FOUR. Sept. 26-27: WOMEN, NATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

WGD Reader: pp. 54-75 (Braidotti et al., Shiva, Agarwal); and pp. 284-309 (Dalsimer and Nisonoff, Hartmann, Moreno)

Friday: Discussion

 

WEEK FIVE. Oct. 3-4: PROLETARIANIZATION AND CHANGING GENDER RELATIONS: A CASE FROM MALAYSIA

Spirits of Resistance: Chapter 1: pp. 1-10, Chapters 3-6: pp. 37-137

Friday: Discussion

 

WEEK SIX. Oct. 10-11: MALAYSIA (cont’d)

Spirits of Resistance: Chapters 7-9: pp. 141-213.

Friday: Documentary on the Global Factory

Assignments are due on Friday.

 

WEEK SEVEN. Oct. 17-18:

Thursday: Review

Friday: In-class midterm exam

 

 

 

WEEK EIGHT. Oct. 24-25:  RURAL INDUSTRIALIZATION AND GENDER RELATIONS IN THE HOUSEHOLD: A CASE FROM JAVA

Factory Daughters: Introduction and Chapter 1: pp. 1-29, Chapters 3, 6, 7: pp. 54-72 and 137-178

Friday: Discussion

 

WEEK NINE. Oct.31-Nov.1: JAVA (Cont’d)

Factory Daughters: Chapters 7-10: pp. 179-249

Friday: Guest Lecture

 

WEEK TEN. Nov. 7-8: GENDER RELATIONS AND RURAL POVERTY IN AFRICA

Making a Living: Introduction and Part I: pp. 1-98

Friday: Discussion

 

WEEK ELEVEN. Nov. 14-15: WOMEN IN MIGRATION

The Kitchen Spoon’s Handle. Introduction, chapters 1, 4, 5 (pp. 1-47 and 99-150)

 

WEEK TWELVE. Nov. 21-22: WOMEN IN MIGRATION (cont’d)

The Kitchen Spoon’s Handle. Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9 (pp. 151-231)

 

WEEK THIRTEEN. Dec. 5-6: GENDER AND GLOBALIZATION

Freeman. (2001). “Is Local: Global as Feminine: Masculine? Rethinking the Gender of Globalization,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol.26, no.4 (folder)

Salzinger. (1997). “From High Heels to Swathed Bodies: Gendered Meanings under Production in Mexico’s Export-Processing Industry,” Feminist Studies, vol.23, no.3, pp.549-574. (folder)

Friday: Review